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Forum Home > The Gothic > Angela Carter's 'The Bloody Chamber'

Griff
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Posts: 45

Thank you very much!! I enjoyed the session too


November 23, 2016 at 3:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lucy Johnson
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Posts: 10

thanks for hosting the session!

November 23, 2016 at 3:04 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

Dr. Bethany Layne at November 23, 2016 at 3:01 PM

Other questions I would have asked, if we had time, are to do with the implications of the title (What is The Bloody Chamber); the direct citaion of Bluebeard at the end of the story; and the feminist implications of the ending.

Feel free to post further about these after we wrap up, and talk amongst yourselves about these are perversions of the originals or revelations of their latent content. 

Or, indeed both. Carter making explicit/ perverse what she considered to be the latent content. Thanks for the seminar Bethany and also to everyone who contributed. Hope it was interesting and useful!

November 23, 2016 at 3:04 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Eli
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Posts: 1

Thank you


November 23, 2016 at 3:04 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dr. Bethany Layne
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Posts: 70

Cheers, everyone! Goodnight! 

November 23, 2016 at 3:05 PM Flag Quote & Reply

HGHastilow
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Posts: 3

Thank you!

November 23, 2016 at 3:05 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Molly Livings
Member
Posts: 7

Thank you, really enjoyed it.

November 23, 2016 at 3:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

OF WOLVES AND WOMEN documentary on Angela Carter: 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bf4whd

August 22, 2018 at 7:32 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/10/17/chamber-of-secrets-the-sorcery-of-angela-carter/

October 12, 2019 at 7:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/themes/fantasy-and-fairy-tale

December 20, 2019 at 7:01 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

http://getangelacarter.com/ is worth a look.

October 1, 2020 at 10:56 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

This is an extract from our forthcoming critical guide to Carter's book. This guide is currently in production with an expected E.T.A. of summer 2021.


The Art of Literature, The Bloody Chamber

Introduction

Forty years and counting after they were first published in 1979, critical debate continues about Carter as a writer and the nature of her collection of stories, or tales as she preferred to call them, The Bloody Chamber. For some critics, fundamentally Carter is a feminist writer and this collection fundamentally feminist in agenda. Certainly in many of the stories the female characters are empowered, breaking out of gender conventions, escaping the clutches of male persecutors, neatly side-stepping conventional narrative paths to victimhood, sometimes even becoming persecutors themselves. As a writer, Carter herself also breaks free from stifling gender restrictions, discarding lady-like propriety like an outdated and ill-fitting corset. Her writing is fearlessly violent, sexual, bawdy, transgressive, full of passionate desire and excess. But Carter’s presentation of female characters, and especially female sexual desire, has also been controversial, with some feminist critics arguing that despite their apparent agency, her female characters remain caught in the net of male desires.

 

Other critics claim the Carter of The Bloody Chamber as an essentially Gothic writer, a Gothic writer who takes classic fairy tales and gives them a dark Gothic wash. It’s not, however, just an eerie mood and atmosphere that Carter adds to the fairy tales. The novelist rifles through the Gothic stock cupboard and plucks out any items she can use. Many of the stories contain Gothic tropes – entrapment in castles, narratives of temptation, sin and punishment, liminal beings, such as vampires and werewolves, darkness, mirrors and moonlight. From the first wave of the Gothic she dusts down and re-engineers the innocent maiden and re-animates her oppressive male persecutor. From Victorian Gothic she picks up liminality, transformation and the collapsing of the distinction between hero and villain. But, part of the third wave of the Gothic, Carter goes further than Stevenson in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde [1886] and, like Anne Rice in Interview with a Vampire [1976] writes, in The Lady of the House of Love, from the perspective of the vampire itself, turning the human world into the disturbing other. But some of these stories are far more Gothic than others. The Courtship of Mr Lyon, for instance, does not have an oppressively gloomy atmosphere and its potential ‘monster’, the beast, turns out not to be very fearsome. Even more obviously, the ribald romp of Puss-in-Boots is tonally at odds with the Gothic – it’s a bawdy comic parable – and its only monster is the dragonish servant who guards the beautiful maiden.

 

 



November 23, 2020 at 7:48 AM Flag Quote & Reply

johnmorgan
Member
Posts: 1

Hi, thanks a lot for sharing it 

January 21, 2021 at 9:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 921

https://artsone.arts.ubc.ca/2017/06/04/of-virginity-and-violence/

November 8, 2021 at 4:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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