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Forum Home > Shakespeare > Recommended websites on Shakespeare

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Pretty chuffed that we got into this list. Look at the other major institutions - Royal Shakespeare Comany. Thanks Emma Smith. 

http://www.englishandmedia.co.uk/emag/Shakes_Websites.pdf

September 25, 2014 at 11:48 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Andrew Muir
Member
Posts: 16

Hello everyone.

This is my first post and I thought it only right that I should acknowledge that it was this very PDF that led me to this fascinating place.  I put a lot of store in what Dr. Smith says.

I have a book on Shakespeare coming out before this Summer (don't worry, this is not self-promotion, I'll take a wild guess that such a thing is against forum rules :) ) and I include this note before the Bibliography at the end:

 

"I would like to also acknowledge the undoubted impact of listening to radio documentaries and audio Shakespeare courses over the years. In time gone by Peter Sacchio accompanied me on a daily commute and, more recently, Emma Smith’s splendid series of podcasts from Oxford University have kept me company on frequent round trips from Cambridge to Bedford. Delays at the infamous Black Cat roundabout and at the A14 roadworks became almost welcome, rather than infuriating, with Dr. Smith for company."


I am sure I am not alone in following her recomendation here.

March 21, 2015 at 7:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

National Theatre discussions of King Lear; the first one the sisters, the 2nd Simon Russel Beale talking about the titular characer. Brilliant revision:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IV7KFy8I39w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgXM0b6PaHw&list=RDtnYInEJ1-v0

April 19, 2015 at 3:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Straightforward information on the play presented rather attractively by the 'original editors' of Spark Notes: 

http://www.litcharts.com/lit/king-lear#.VVC16tBjg04.twitter

June 5, 2015 at 3:56 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Here's the new Shakey website from peripeteia member Andrew Muir: http://www.a-muir.co.uk/csf/

Check it out.

July 1, 2015 at 10:20 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Nicholas Hynter is one of our foremost theatre directors. In this clip he discusses his recent National Theatre production of Othello

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2UNH8aSLDQ&feature=em-subs_digest

September 6, 2015 at 5:45 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

And here's the opening 5 minutes of King Lear from the recent National Theatre production. Very interesting staging: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_womZ_BE0Q

September 6, 2015 at 5:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

The Theatre

Book of the Week, 1606: William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06gqdwm

October 12, 2015 at 6:16 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Andrew Muir
Member
Posts: 16

When Dr Emma Smith was the guest expert for the King Lear seminar, I praised her podcast on the play.  I always do praise her podcasts whenever and wherever I can as I love her Shakespeare talks. I just discovered - and so am sending this in case others had, like me until recently, overlooked them - her podcasts on other Renaissance dramatists.  These are marvellous in their own right but also for studying Shakespeare.  The one on Middleton and Decker's The Roaring Girl taught me an enormous amount that is directly applicable to Shakespeare, for example.

https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/people/emma-smith


November 11, 2015 at 12:07 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Using this website from Oxford University's Bodleian library you can examine differences between versions of Shakespeare's plays. For King Lear, the quarto and folio editions are quite different in a number of places...

http://firstfolio.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/

February 26, 2016 at 4:59 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Check out this online Shakespeare magazine. It's only been up and running for a short while but looks like a potentially great resources for teachers & students: https://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_09

February 27, 2016 at 5:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Check out this online Shakespeare magazine. It's only been up and running for a short while but looks like a potentially great resources for teachers & students: 

https://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_09

February 27, 2016 at 5:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

British Library resources: http://www.bl.uk/shakespeare?ns_campaign=disco_lit&ns_mchannel=bl_website&ns_source=carousel&ns_linkname=shakespeare_more_link&ns_fee=0

March 16, 2016 at 9:51 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 855

Useful discussion of Hamlet on BBC Radio 4's In Our Time programme: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09jqtfs

January 5, 2018 at 2:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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