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Forum Home > The Gothic > Gothic monsters

Griff
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Posts: 45

Could you say that Gothic is a genre that encapsulates the fears and worries of the time that it is written?

May 9, 2017 at 2:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

and, one of the key ones for thinking about monstrosity, the human and the animal.

May 9, 2017 at 2:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Marshall
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Posts: 56

Molly Livings at May 9, 2017 at 2:29 PM

I thought only certain types of gothic writters used trangression in terms of blurring boundaires, such as angela carter.

Would the ultimate blurring of boundaries not be that of the Count, the three vampiresses and Lucy Westenra in Dracula - that of life and death?

May 9, 2017 at 2:33 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Griff
Member
Posts: 45

The Island of Dr Moreau then about worries of progression in science and the blurring between human and animal

May 9, 2017 at 2:34 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
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Posts: 61

I certainly would say that the gothic is a genre that reflects cultural anxieties, although I would suggest that it tends to reflect them through this blurring of boundaries (so destabilising binary categories).

May 9, 2017 at 2:34 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29
The boundary which is blurred is specific to the individual author: what is it they are being oppressed by and need to break free from. A Simple form of escapism
May 9, 2017 at 2:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
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Posts: 61

The Island of Dr. Moreau is a great example - reflecting anxieties aroudn both scientific progress and new theories of degeneration (will just come onto this)

May 9, 2017 at 2:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tom Eastment
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Posts: 12

Prior to this even, we have Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde which explores the relatively new concept of science and Darwin's Theory of Evolution which opens up scary possibilities e.g. whether humans possess the ability to regress 

May 9, 2017 at 2:36 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29
the human and animal. So primitive forms and desires in contrast to civilised society
May 9, 2017 at 2:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Marshall
Member
Posts: 56

Or that man is ultimately an animal with baser instincts and that the civilised society is but the veneer.

May 9, 2017 at 2:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Griff
Member
Posts: 45

The idea of Duality is present in Jekyll and Hyde - where the boundaries between monster and protagonist are blurred 

May 9, 2017 at 2:40 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

Apologies got booted...

Another would be The Picture of Dorian Gray, which has been suggested to reflect cultural anxieties around homosexuality (the so-called 'homosexual panic' of the 1890s)


May 9, 2017 at 2:40 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

but it aims to provoke anxiety in its audience by blurring boundaries between masculinity/feminity and hetero/homosexuality (esp. though Dorian).

May 9, 2017 at 2:40 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
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Posts: 61

If we're thinking about the boundary between human and animal - so relevant to J&H amongst others, then I think the concept of degeneration is key here.

May 9, 2017 at 2:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29

Griff at May 9, 2017 at 2:40 PM

The idea of Duality is present in Jekyll and Hyde - where the boundaries between monster and protagonist are blurred 

The same as Frankenstein
May 9, 2017 at 2:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

A couple of cases in point: https://cinesocialuk.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/dr-jekyll-and-mr-hyde-post-transformation.jpg

May 9, 2017 at 2:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

And from the 1922 adaptation of Dracula, Nosferatu: https://domcappelloblog.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/max-schreck-nosferatu.jpg

May 9, 2017 at 2:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29

Graeme Pedlingham at May 9, 2017 at 2:40 PM

Apologies got booted...

Another would be The Picture of Dorian Gray, which has been suggested to reflect cultural anxieties around homosexuality (the so-called 'homosexual panic' of the 1890s)

 

 

Is Jekyll and Hyde not also about this. The 'shame' Jekyll feels which fuels him to create Hyde. Enfield coming home from "the end of the world" at three in the morning etc
May 9, 2017 at 2:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

I don't know how familiar people are with degeneration as a theory, but I tend to find the best way to describe it is Darwinian evolution in reverse. The concern was that if people evolved, then it is also possible for them to devolve...

May 9, 2017 at 2:43 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29
Both the images have delightful teeth!
May 9, 2017 at 2:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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