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Forum Home > The Gothic > Gothic monsters

Griff
Member
Posts: 45

She's certainly passive in any case


May 9, 2017 at 2:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

And the horse, interesting to think of it as mad, which it could be - a kind of frenzy. Or potentially blind.

May 9, 2017 at 2:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Marshall
Member
Posts: 56

Sleep - the place where the imagination and fear run riot, uncontrollable, and terrifying....

May 9, 2017 at 2:11 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

It coudl be poison Carly, an interesting idea - is this a scene of suicide? But that passivity is certainly key. This can be read in lots of ways - if it is sleep, as Rob says, then then demonic figures seems to be physical manifestations of, perhaps, unconscious thoughts....

May 9, 2017 at 2:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Griff
Member
Posts: 45

The stark contrast in colour is prominent too

May 9, 2017 at 2:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Molly Livings
Member
Posts: 7

Believe this is not a sleeping pose but maybe an idealised suicide 

May 9, 2017 at 2:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Marshall
Member
Posts: 56

Possibly laudanum taken quite commonly at the time by ladies to help with their "fits of the vapours" and "hysteria" (O tempora O mores!)

May 9, 2017 at 2:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 837

The sleep of reason breeds monsters?

May 9, 2017 at 2:14 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

It certainly could be suicide - but one of the things that really interests me here is the impossibility of telling. This blurs the boundaries between life and death, creating a kind of undeath....

May 9, 2017 at 2:14 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Marshall
Member
Posts: 56

A precursor to the vampirism incarnate in Lord Rutherford?

May 9, 2017 at 2:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Griff
Member
Posts: 45

The lack of clarity on whether the horse is mad or blind or possessed must too then be important

May 9, 2017 at 2:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

If we look just at the demon on her chest for the moment - how would we describe it's presence?

May 9, 2017 at 2:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Molly Livings
Member
Posts: 7

The colours of her white dress (purity) and the darkened background with the evil liminal figures create a bold contrast which could be attempting to represent heaven and hell. 

May 9, 2017 at 2:17 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Griff
Member
Posts: 45

The demon is quite oppressive

May 9, 2017 at 2:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

Absolutely - many later Gothic works of all kinds will then use this same ambiguity between life and death, with vampirism and the later zombie being classic examples. And the madness/blindness of the horse is certainly another unsettling set of ambiguities.

May 9, 2017 at 2:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29
Love can drive people insane, it is blind and can kill. Is the goblin a representation of an inappropriate love choice or a form of vengeance for her choice?
May 9, 2017 at 2:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Molly Livings
Member
Posts: 7

The presence is dominanting over her heart, with a vicious look on his face 

May 9, 2017 at 2:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 837

Uncannily the gargoyle also seems to be aware of our presence - it's looking directly at us.

May 9, 2017 at 2:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

carly curry
Member
Posts: 29
Or maybe the goblin is representative of the love that oppresses her from the patriarchal society? Death is her only way out?
May 9, 2017 at 2:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Graeme Pedlingham
Member
Posts: 61

Oppressive, literally and metaphorically - a very useful way to think of it. It clearly oppresses the woman/victim, but I'd suggest that it's also challenging us as spectators - its gaze is directional confrontational.

May 9, 2017 at 2:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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