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Forum Home > Poetry > Poems of the Decade

Antonia Fox
Member
Posts: 5

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Thanks Antonia. 'On Her Blindness' is an emotional poem, whereas perhaps 'The Gun' is a little more ideas driven.

I'd agree with 'On Her Blindness' being more emotional. or rather sentimental. It's just 'The Gun'  just seems dull. While the beginning brings in a reader, the rest of the poem seems a little lacking.

May 4, 2016 at 2:17 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

Antonia Fox at May 4, 2016 at 2:17 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Thanks Antonia. 'On Her Blindness' is an emotional poem, whereas perhaps 'The Gun' is a little more ideas driven.

I'd agree with 'On Her Blindness' being more emotional. or rather sentimental. It's just 'The Gun'  just seems dull. While the beginning brings in a reader, the rest of the poem seems a little lacking.

Dull? Would bringing a gun into your house be dull? And then all that carnage and the erotic thrill the narrator gets from it. And then that extraordinarily vivid image of the King of Death stepping out of the world of fairy tales or nightmares. Dull?

May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

boutnothing
Member
Posts: 11

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:16 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:14 PM

Hello, hope alls well this evening!

I was just wondering if you have time to discuss which poems to link together? 

Of course, Mr/ Miss Boutnothing. Do you want to start with a poem and we'll see how many productive links we can make?

Miss aha, thank you.

The Furthest Distances I’ve Travelled- Leontia Flynn

May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

mcdoe018
Member
Posts: 3
My favourite poem would have to be please hold as it brings a more humourous side to poetry also it mirrors the way in which the narrator is feeling about this repetitive on going call which has no end or conclusion to help his problem
May 4, 2016 at 2:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:16 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:14 PM

Hello, hope alls well this evening!

I was just wondering if you have time to discuss which poems to link together? 

Of course, Mr/ Miss Boutnothing. Do you want to start with a poem and we'll see how many productive links we can make?

Miss aha, thank you.

The Furthest Distances I’ve Travelled- Leontia Flynn

Okay, Miss Boutnothing. Thematic links are usually productive - what would anyone say the main them of 'The Furthest Distance' is?

May 4, 2016 at 2:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

mcdoe018 at May 4, 2016 at 2:21 PM

My favourite poem would have to be please hold as it brings a more humourous side to poetry also it mirrors the way in which the narrator is feeling about this repetitive on going call which has no end or conclusion to help his problem

I agree, and Ciaran might join us this evening, so he'll be pleased to hear that. Also the frustrations with technology, whether it be your phone, the school computers (incredibly sluggish tonight) or automated services are so common. THough the poem's comic, it also makes a serious point, I think.

May 4, 2016 at 2:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

boutnothing
Member
Posts: 11

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:21 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:16 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:14 PM

Hello, hope alls well this evening!

I was just wondering if you have time to discuss which poems to link together? 

Of course, Mr/ Miss Boutnothing. Do you want to start with a poem and we'll see how many productive links we can make?

Miss aha, thank you.

The Furthest Distances I’ve Travelled- Leontia Flynn

Okay, Miss Boutnothing. Thematic links are usually productive - what would anyone say the main them of 'The Furthest Distance' is?

Perhaps journeys? 

May 4, 2016 at 2:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Antonia Fox
Member
Posts: 5

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Antonia Fox at May 4, 2016 at 2:17 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Thanks Antonia. 'On Her Blindness' is an emotional poem, whereas perhaps 'The Gun' is a little more ideas driven.

I'd agree with 'On Her Blindness' being more emotional. or rather sentimental. It's just 'The Gun'  just seems dull. While the beginning brings in a reader, the rest of the poem seems a little lacking.

Dull? Would bringing a gun into your house be dull? And then all that carnage and the erotic thrill the narrator gets from it. And then that extraordinarily vivid image of the King of Death stepping out of the world of fairy tales or nightmares. Dull?

That's what I mean, the beginning, in which the gun is brought into the house makes a reader stop and think for a moment about the consequences of such an action. Then the imagery and tone, in my opinion begins to falter for the next two stanzas. This could be deliberate, as everything seems to be in a darker tone. Then the next stanza picks up with the gory imagery. The last stanza in particular makes use of imagery. I suppose dull wasn't the right word, maybe off-putting would be more appropriate.

May 4, 2016 at 2:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Caroline
Member
Posts: 4

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Antonia Fox at May 4, 2016 at 2:17 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Thanks Antonia. 'On Her Blindness' is an emotional poem, whereas perhaps 'The Gun' is a little more ideas driven.

I'd agree with 'On Her Blindness' being more emotional. or rather sentimental. It's just 'The Gun'  just seems dull. While the beginning brings in a reader, the rest of the poem seems a little lacking.

Dull? Would bringing a gun into your house be dull? And then all that carnage and the erotic thrill the narrator gets from it. And then that extraordinarily vivid image of the King of Death stepping out of the world of fairy tales or nightmares. Dull?

I found the gun to be interesting after I read more about it, i think the poet incorporates interesting ideas about how opinions can change depending on the situation. In the begining of the poem the gun has strong connotations of death which the poet seems uneasy about, but then we can see her opinion has changed when she decides, "A gun brings a house alive", an opposing view to what was said beforehand.

May 4, 2016 at 2:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

pol$ki
Member
Posts: 9

I reckon The Lammas Hireling is an outstanding image, due to the confusion created by the first impression and the single-handed depth it has. Plus you can interpret it literally or figuratively, which opens the poem for a huge amount of interpretations.

May 4, 2016 at 2:26 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:24 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:21 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:16 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:14 PM

Hello, hope alls well this evening!

I was just wondering if you have time to discuss which poems to link together? 

Of course, Mr/ Miss Boutnothing. Do you want to start with a poem and we'll see how many productive links we can make?

Miss aha, thank you.

The Furthest Distances I’ve Travelled- Leontia Flynn

Okay, Miss Boutnothing. Thematic links are usually productive - what would anyone say the main them of 'The Furthest Distance' is?

Perhaps journeys? 

Yes, quite, though in the end the narrator stops travelling between places and begins to value more the metaphorical travelling between people in relationships. So, in the end, I think the poem's theme is valuing the ordinary relationships we have with people, relationships we too easily take for granted. What do you think?

May 4, 2016 at 2:26 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

Caroline at May 4, 2016 at 2:25 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Antonia Fox at May 4, 2016 at 2:17 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Thanks Antonia. 'On Her Blindness' is an emotional poem, whereas perhaps 'The Gun' is a little more ideas driven.

I'd agree with 'On Her Blindness' being more emotional. or rather sentimental. It's just 'The Gun'  just seems dull. While the beginning brings in a reader, the rest of the poem seems a little lacking.

Dull? Would bringing a gun into your house be dull? And then all that carnage and the erotic thrill the narrator gets from it. And then that extraordinarily vivid image of the King of Death stepping out of the world of fairy tales or nightmares. Dull?

I found the gun to be interesting after I read more about it, i think the poet incorporates interesting ideas about how opinions can change depending on the situation. In the begining of the poem the gun has strong connotations of death which the poet seems uneasy about, but then we can see her opinion has changed when she decides, "A gun brings a house alive", an opposing view to what was said beforehand.

Great points, Caroline. Yes, there something paradoxical about the presence of death making living more vivid. 

May 4, 2016 at 2:29 PM Flag Quote & Reply

boutnothing
Member
Posts: 11

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:26 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:24 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:21 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:16 PM

boutnothing at May 4, 2016 at 2:14 PM

Hello, hope alls well this evening!

I was just wondering if you have time to discuss which poems to link together? 

Of course, Mr/ Miss Boutnothing. Do you want to start with a poem and we'll see how many productive links we can make?

Miss aha, thank you.

The Furthest Distances I’ve Travelled- Leontia Flynn

Okay, Miss Boutnothing. Thematic links are usually productive - what would anyone say the main them of 'The Furthest Distance' is?

Perhaps journeys? 

Yes, quite, though in the end the narrator stops travelling between places and begins to value more the metaphorical travelling between people in relationships. So, in the end, I think the poem's theme is valuing the ordinary relationships we have with people, relationships we too easily take for granted. What do you think?

Material, Inheritance, Effects, Genetics?

May 4, 2016 at 2:31 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

pol$ki at May 4, 2016 at 2:26 PM

I reckon The Lammas Hireling is an outstanding image, due to the confusion created by the first impression and the single-handed depth it has. Plus you can interpret it literally or figuratively, which opens the poem for a huge amount of interpretations.

Agreed, It's haunting, mysterious, stays with you and lyrical too!

May 4, 2016 at 2:31 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

So, yes, I think Material, Inheritance, Effects and Genetics could be compared to The Furthest Distance. So too could A Minor Role, On Her Blindness and perhaps You, Shiva and My Mum. 

May 4, 2016 at 2:33 PM Flag Quote & Reply

pol$ki
Member
Posts: 9

What's your favorite poem and why Mr Bowen?

May 4, 2016 at 2:34 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

How about comparing The Furthest Distance in terms of its form or language? Anybody got any idea how we might do that?

May 4, 2016 at 2:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

benkell98
Member
Posts: 2

My favourite poem would have to be 'Eat Me' as I find it to be a disturbing and un-easy topic, that is expressed as an everyday, normal thing illustrated through tone as well as language, I also found it the easiest to annotate and talk about poetic techniques. Whereas in some of the other poems the poetic device were harder to find and also talk about.


May 4, 2016 at 2:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neil Bowen
Administrator
Posts: 835

pol$ki at May 4, 2016 at 2:34 PM

What's your favorite poem and why Mr Bowen?

There are so many to choose from...I admire the Carson - such a clever and difficult rhyme scheme and deep thinking about history. Burnside's also has the philosophical dimension I think is necessary in all great poems. Then there's Heaney, who's got to be one of the greatest poets. But, my personal favourite would be 'The Lammas Hireling', probably. 

May 4, 2016 at 2:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

boutnothing
Member
Posts: 11

Neil Bowen at May 4, 2016 at 2:35 PM

How about comparing The Furthest Distance in terms of its form or language? Anybody got any idea how we might do that?

It's written in free verse mirroring instability, enjambment is used as though time is passing like in The Map Woman and also it is in 1st person narrative?

May 4, 2016 at 2:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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